10cc

Blog Post – 10cc – I’m Not In Love

10cc – I’M NOT IN LOVE – More tape loops!

In this blog post, we take the way-back machine to look at the recording of a classic track, “I’m Not In Love” by 10cc.  If you’ve heard this track, and most people have, that middle section with the ‘big boys don’t cry’ breakdown causes you to sit up and take notice!  Actually, the single version that also was released removed that section, so as to not disrupt the flow of the song.

Did you also know that the song won three Ivor Novello Awards in 1976 for Best Pop Song, International Hit of the Year, and Most Performed British Work?  Yes, and it’s been played on radio over THREE million times!

What is that strange ‘wash’ of sound in the background underneath the lyrics and instruments?  How was that created?  How about that pulsing kick drum sound?  Read on…

10cc were known for endless studio experimentation and creativity.  When Eric Stewart brought the song to the other band members, after having Graham Gouldman finish is, it was a bossa nova track and the two other members, Kevin Godley and Lol Creme didn’t like it.  Godley went so far as to say “It’s crap! Leave it…”, which they did for awhile before returning to it when a studio employee was overheard whistling the melody!  Godley suggested for it to work it had to be radically overhauled, which resulted in the lead vocal being mainly supported by backing vocals, but oh what backing vocals.

The band also decided that a full drum kit would overpower the song and make it less powerful, so the pulsing kick drum is actually a Moog synthesiser!

Three weeks was spent in the studio recording Gouldman, Godley and Creme singing “ahhh” 16 times for each note of the chromatic scale, building up a “choir” of 48 voices for each note of the scale.  This was a great start, but the notes being sung stopped, as they ran out of air 🙂  How to remedy this?  Well, how about tape loops? 12 resulting tape loops were printed, each devoted to a fader on the desk.  That way you could play chords by raising the faders in succession.  The edit points, where the loops where joined together were largely hidden by the general wash of sound, and resulted in a strange sustained chorus of voices.  Nothing sounded like it then, and nothing as sounded like it since!  Except for the track ‘Cry’, later released by the duo of Godley and Creme, many many years later.  But, that’s for another post…

For more information, check out the ‘making of’ documentary below on YouTube.

 

If you want to unleash your inner 10cc, why not give us a call to discuss your grand vision!  Maybe you just want to record a song with regular instruments, which is fine by us 🙂

Until next time, see you in the studio!

#blog, #10cc, #music,#ImNotInLove, #GodleyAndCreme, #recordingstudiostoronto, #recordingstudiotoronto, #torontorecordingstudio, #torontorecordingstudios, #Toronto

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222 Gerrard St East
Toronto, Ontario
M5A 2E8

T: 416-348-8718
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Toll-free (outside GTA)
1-855-998-6799

info@number9.ca

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music education

Blog Post – Music Education – Why It’s Important

Ok, there’s been a ton of information around in the recent past showing how music education can help children and adolescents with language skills and increasing IQ; how music therapy can help seniors with cognitive functioning, boredom, positive outlook and numerous other benefits; but now there’s a study that music lessons can help BABIES!  Yes, even before they learn how to talk they can be learning music which will help them learn to talk!  How cool is that?

Before we get to that, let’s examine some of the benefits for kids and adolescents:

  1. Language Development – Numerous studies have demonstrated that music changes the ways kids learn by formalizing their learning and getting them ready for later learning.  According to PBS: “Research has found that learning music facilitates learning other subjects and enhances skills that children inevitably use in other areas.”
  2. Increased IQ – Contained in the same PBS blog post, “A study by E. Glenn Schellenberg at the University of Toronto at Mississauga, as published in a 2004 issue of Psychological Science, found a small increase in the IQs of six-year-olds who were given weekly voice and piano lessons.”
  3. The Brain Works Harder  Research indicates the brain of a musician, even a young one, works differently than that of a nonmusician. “There’s some good neuroscience research that children involved in music have larger growth of neural activity than people not in music training.
  4. Spatial-Temporal Skills  Research has also found a causal link between music and spatial intelligence, which means that understanding music can help children visualize various elements that should go together, like they would do when solving a math problem.

What about babies?

In the study done at the link below, they “randomly put 47 nine-month-old infants in either a musical group or a control group and completed 12 15-minute-long sessions of activities designed for that group.  Babies in the music group sat with their parents, who guided them through the sessions by tapping out beats in time with the music with the goal of helping them learn a difficult musical rhythm.”  So, what was the final outcome?

“Babies in the music group had stronger brain responses to both music and speech sounds compared with babies in the control group. This shows that musical experience, as early as nine months of age, improved infants’ ability to process both musical and speech rhythms. These skills are important building blocks for learning to speak.”

The results of the entire study can be found at the link below, as well as the PBS blog post detailing the general benefits for music education.  I’ve also included a link to the benefits of music therapy for seniors.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/music-arts/the-benefits-of-music-education/

http://theconversation.com/could-early-music-training-help-babies-learn-language-58568

http://www.retireathome.com/benefits-music-therapy-seniors/

If you have any ideas for future blog posts or a question or comment about this blog post, we’re only an email or phone call away:

www.number9.ca

222 Gerrard St East
Toronto, Ontario
M5A 2E8

T: 416-348-8718
F: 416-348-9668

Toll-free (outside GTA)
1-855-998-6799

info@number9.ca

George Rondina's photo.
#musiceducation, #musictherapy, #musiclessons, #kids, #PBS, #Toronto, #Blog, #torontorecordingstudio, #recordingstudiotoronto, #torontorecordingstudios, #recordingstudiostoronto, #music

Fort MacMurray Fire

Blog Post – Fort McMurray Fire – We Can Help

Number 9 will be donating a percentage of our proceeds for the next 2 months to help those affected by the Fort McMurray forest fires. Music can change the world. Together we can do great things.  Families are in need, houses and buildings destroyed in one of the greatest disasters in Canadian history.

If you’ve been thinking of booking some studio time, why not now?  Not only will you be getting a fantastic finished product, you’ll also know that your hard earned money is helping you and perhaps thousands of others in a time of need!  You feel good when a song is finally recorded, imagine how amazing it will feel with a double bonus?

Why should you donate as well? Yes, insurance will cover long term losses, but in the meantime, residents need temporary shelter, food, clothing, medicine and that all costs money.  And yes, there are some great orgs like Red Cross with boots on the ground, but they need $$$ to do what they do.  So, please donate NOW and in the future in the event there are further needs.

www.number9.ca

222 Gerrard St East
Toronto, Ontario
M5A 2E8

T: 416-348-8718
F: 416-348-9668

Toll-free (outside GTA)
1-855-998-6799

info@number9.ca

George Rondina's photo.
#fortmcfire, #FortMcMurrayFire, #DoGood, #RedCross

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